Browsing the blog archives for August, 2009

The Capacity to Convene

When working with educational and non-profit executives I encourage each to consider their capacity to convene.  Specifically, how effectively can they convene individuals of influence and affluence from a variety of perspectives – business, political, religious, and/or other leaders – to advance the organization?  Or to put it another way, how often will important people […]

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The Urban Legends of Fundraising – Part III of III

Urban legend – An urban legend, urban myth, or urban tale is a form of modern folklore consisting of stories thought to be factual by those circulating them. (Wikipedia) The final installment of the 3-part Urban Legends of Fundraising messages focuses on the faulty thinking that the broader economic environment will greatly impact your organization’s […]

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The Urban Legends of Fundraising – Part II of III

Urban legend – An urban legend, urban myth, or urban tale is a form of modern folklore consisting of stories thought to be factual by those circulating them. (Wikipedia) In part II of our three-part series, I am focusing on the “It’s All About The Ask” Urban Legend. Specifically, this Urban Legend purports that fundraisers […]

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The Urban Legends of Fundraising – Part I of III

Urban legend – An urban legend, urban myth, or urban tale is a form of modern folklore consisting of stories thought to be factual by those circulating them. (Wikipedia) This week, my aim is to debunk a few urban legends regarding fundraising. These are examples of “conventional wisdom” that, over the years, I’ve heard repeated often by otherwise […]

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And we wonder why college costs continue to soar

According to the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education (and many others) the higher education system in the United States is already out of financial reach for many in our society. Taking on debilitating debt is the primary way (if not the only way) to fund college for most families. But not so […]

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Which leadership style will you choose?

In my work with university leaders I’ve come across 3 basic categories of leaders: The Teller – this is the leader who thinks of the plans herself and then tells those in her charge the end goal as well as the path to get there.  From my experience, I would say this is about 60% […]

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Why college tours are still important

Ahh, yes, the ole College tour remains alive and well. Even in a horrible economic downturn, that elusive but all-important variable, college “fit,” still encourages families to spend money and time to travel and tour prospective college campuses. People still want and need to feel welcomed, to be part of a community, and to touch […]

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Achieving work-life balance? Is that even the right question?

A see-saw doesn’t balance for long. That’s the visual I have always conjured when people talk of “work-life balance.” In a former life, I studied the concept by surveying employees only to find that sustaining work life-balance is, you guessed it, awfully hard. I think the problem is that the very phrasing we’ve used to […]

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From “Board of Trustees” to “Board of Trust-Builders”

Beyond other legal duties and responsibilities, a traditional view of Board membership suggests a fiduciary responsibility – they hold the organization in trust. This conventional (and passive) role is still very much needed, but an important new dimension must be added: a positive, active role. They cannot simply hold public trust. They can and should […]

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From tasks to relationships – the real work of the executive

For many first-time college presidents, the new position is exhilarating but also overwhelming.  Many say that the time demands are breath-taking and the sheer scope of the enterprise is daunting.  However, for many new presidents, the biggest challenge they will face is more nuanced but more difficult to tackle – an adjustment from a task-orientation […]

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